Catalog of Disasters

In an article published July 17, 2019, DC Media Group reports on the catalog of disasters inflicted by the Mountain Valley Pipeline on the LaFerriere family and their Blackberry Springs Farm in West Virginia. In September 2018, despite cease and desist orders, the organic farm was showered repeatedly with pellets of Earth Guard Edge dropped from helicopters. The pellets are an erosion control product containing acrylamide, a carcinogen. LaFerriere, his wife and children, and an intern were all struck by the pellets while harvesting ginseng a quarter mile from the MVP right of way, with resulting contusions and lacerations. Specialists said nothing could be done to mitigate the damage, since once the pellet gets wet, it gets into the soil.  The organic status of the farm has been jeopardized.

“MVP is required to adhere to an Organic Management Plan it filed with FERC, but LaFerriere said they still hadn’t provided him with any information with regard to its implementation. He claims he hasn’t been allowed to speak with the expert from the International Organic Inspectors Association hired by MVP–who has been out to the property twice–and he still hasn’t received a complete list of materials that MVP would be using on the farm. MVP also wouldn’t tell him much about the pale green coating on the 42″ diameter pipeline. His concern about the coating degrading and contaminating the soil and water is shared by FERC, which last week sent a letter to MVP asking about its safety after two years of sitting in the sun.”

Last year, LaFerriere asked for 72 hours notice before MVP cut trees in the right-of-way so he could move some materials. They failed to give notice, and felled trees on the materials, ruining them. MVP had to pay to replace them.

MVP maintains they have “retained an organic consultant to train workers and environmental inspectors and monitor construction activities and remediation. LaFerriere said that no monitors or inspectors have been introduced to them, and he has not seen anyone on site that he can identify as a organically trained monitor.”

Because Laferriere believed MVP wasn’t honoring its organic management plan requirements, he sent yet another cease and desist order; MVP representatives agreed to meet with him, but cancelled at the last minute.

On July 16, only an hour after the scheduled (ten cancelled) meeting meant to discuss the Laferriere’s concerns over MVP’s failure to adhere to the organic management plan requirements, “an excavator operating on the right-of-way tipped over onto its side. The excavator was on relatively flat terrain, not on a steep hill or slope, LaFerriere said. Fluids spilled out, and nearly 20 workers were required to bag soil that was contaminated. He didn’t observe any barrier or protective silt socks put in place to contain the spill. The driver was able to exit the excavator and walk away with the assistance of co-workers.”

The article notes that, “Problems with MVP construction have not been limited to Blackberry Springs Farm. MVP was cited with more than 300 violations by the end of 2018 alone. As a consequence, many of the pipeline’s permits have been revoked. FERC has approved 125 requests by MVP to deviate from its original work plan, and most appear to be related to efforts correct erosion events.”

Also in recent days, MVP construction materials in Virginia were swept down the Blackwater River by heavy rains, ending up in Smith Mountain Lake, where they are a safety hazard, particularly for boaters. Because of its many violations in Virginia, attorney general Mark Herring filed a civil lawsuit against MVP in October 2018. But because he refuses to issue a stop work order, construction and the resulting devastation continues.

Read the full DC Media Group article here.

Related article in the July 15, 2019 Virginia Mercury, MVP’s violations show ‘complete absence of any and all meaningful regulation’