Category Archives: Environmental Impact

Hurricane Could Devastate Pipeline Projects

A September 11, 2018 Washington Post article, Hurricane could devastate Virginia pipeline project that is already struggling with changing weather, points out that the wet summer of 2018 “has already overcome some efforts to prevent runoff and erosion” along then Mountain Valley Pipeline route, and the Atlantic Coast Pipeline will face similar problems if construction begins on that.

State officials say that even if the projects meet all construction guidelines, “those guidelines are based on standards that do not account for recent changes in weather patterns. …. In some cases, a level of rain that once may have occurred every two years has instead happened more than once in a month, staff members said. ‘There have certainly been conversations that given precipitation and climatic changes that . . . maybe there should be a different standard, but at this moment that’s what your regulation says,’ Melanie Davenport, the director of water permitting, told the [State Water Control] board.”

Department of Environmental Quality officials, their numbers reduced after a decade of budget and staff cuts, are unable to monitor the construction properly, especially given the steep and rough terrain and the many stream crossings of both the MVP and ACP.

Erosion controls have already proved inadequate for current levels of rainfall, and pipeline zones could be devastated by Florence. David Sligh, who is retired from the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality and now works with the Wild Virginia advocacy group, spoke to the Post: “‘I don’t believe they can, in some of these circumstances, do anything that would be adequate,’ he said. ‘That’s the real crime here, if I can use that word. People have known, the companies have known, DEQ has known that the pollution control measures are inadequate. The fact they’ve been allowed to go forward makes me very angry.'”

In the Neighborhood


A video about the neighborhood around the proposed compressor station.

Weigh in as Virginia officials consider the Atlantic Coast Pipeline compressor station.

Let the Virginia Air Board know that compressor stations like the one Dominion is planning for Union Hill pose health risks for neighbors and pollute the surrounding community’s air.

How to comment?  Go here.

Challenge the Compressor Station Air Permit


Send your comments to DEQ to challenge the air permit for the proposed ACP compressor station in Union Hill by September 11, 2018. Help deny the air permit for the ACP Compressor Station that would endanger and diminish the health and land values of all residents of Buckingham County and destroy the lives of the historic African American community of Union Hill. No compressor station = No ACP.  To comment, follow instructions on the Friends of Buckingham page.

The Department of Environmental Quality Public Hearing on the draft air permit for the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline Compressor Station will be Tuesday September 11, 2018, from 5:00 pm to 9:30 pm.

After you have sent your written comments to DEQ, please come to the September 11 public hearing and pre-hearing vigil It will be at the Buckingham County Middle School, 1184 High School Rd, Buckingham, VA 23921 (off of Hwy 60/West James Anderson Hwy).  Arrive at 4 PM to sign up to speak, and for vigil, music, snacks, press conference and materials to help you draft your comment. The sooner you arrive to sign up to comment the better!  Comments will be limited to 3 minutes, and, if possible, it would be good to have a written copy of your comments at the hearing to give to DEQ staff.

This compressor station, a giant one, even by industry standards would bring loud constant noise and release toxic poisons into Buckingham’s air and water. The health of children is particularly vulnerable to the methane, formaldehyde, arsenic, benzene, xylene and other compounds the compressor will regularly release. The compressor station would create a fire and explosion hazard completely beyond the capacity of distant volunteer firefighters. The station wold have few staff on site and would be built on a former slave plantation atop the unmarked slave graves of Union Hill ancestors.

Shout-Out for Pipeline CSI and Mountain Valley Watch

An August 24, 2018, article in ThinkProgress, All-volunteer groups patrol construction of gas pipeline projects in Virginia, North Carolina, explains the background of the all-volunteer groups patrolling pipeline construction projects in West Virginia, Virginia, and North Carolina. The article includes extensive quotes from Rick Webb, David Sligh, and Kirk Bowers. Both Pipeline CSI and Mountain Valley Watch were created to monitor construction of the Atlantic Coast and Mountain Valley Pipelines, with trained volunteers essentially serving as citizen regulatory agencies, since the state regulatory agencies have neither the staff nor the will to monitor the massive projects as needed.

“In some cases, these volunteer monitoring groups have gathered more information on the pipelines’ impact on the environment and private lands than the regulators that are paid to monitor the projects. The mission of these all-volunteer oversight groups is to make sure laws are obeyed and no corners are cut during construction. And if the volunteers do their jobs well enough, they hope to provide enough evidence of violations to force regulators to issue permanent stop-work orders on the projects.”

A trained group of experts are monitoring and documenting problems in water quality, erosion and sedimentation control, and runoff with sound scientific results and “evidence grade” information – information strong enough to use in court. Often the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality has been unable to get in on-site and observe problems, and only knows of violations because citizen observers are in the field doing the work with on-the-ground monitoring and aerial surveys.

“With previous construction projects, inspectors with the Virginia DEQ would, as Webb described, apologetically tell pipeline construction crews that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was forcing them to keep close tabs on their work. ‘Everybody blamed the EPA’ for making everyone do extra work, Webb said. With the creation of the Pipeline CSI, ‘they can blame us,’ he noted.”

Information on the Pipeline CSI here.

Information on Mountain Valley Watch here or on Facebook.