Category Archives: Landowners

Take a Day Hike or Camp Overnight in a Bath County Old Growth Forest


The biggest regional land-clearing project since the federal highway program of the 1960s is now underway in Virginia. In order to build the Atlantic Coast and Mountain Valley pipelines, Dominion Energy and EQT are targeting vulnerable communities, destroying precious ecosystems, and threatening the livelihoods of Virginians far and wide.

Enough is enough! Visit Bath County this summer for a continuous peaceful and family-friendly encampment on the property of Bill and Lynn Limpert. The Atlantic Coast Pipeline is slated to go right through their property, destroying hundreds of its jaw-dropping old growth trees, and decapitating an entire ridgeline known locally as “Miracle Ridge.” To participate, sign up here. For more information, check out a recent article in the Richmond Times-Dispatch

No Pipeline Summer: Camp to Save the Limperts’ Land


Sign up HERE for a day hike or an overnight stay at a miraculous old-growth forest in Bath County Virginia, threatened by the Atlantic Coast Pipeline.

The biggest regional land-clearing project since the federal highway program of the 1960s is now underway in Virginia. In order to build the Atlantic Coast and Mountain Valley pipelines, Dominion Energy and EQT are targeting vulnerable communities, destroying precious ecosystems, and threatening the livelihoods of Virginians far and wide.

Enough is enough. Join pipeline opponents in Bath County this summer for a continuous peaceful and family-friendly encampment on the property of Bill and Lynn Limpert. The Atlantic Coast Pipeline is slated to go right through their property, destroying hundreds of its jaw-dropping old growth trees, and decapitating an entire ridgeline known locally as “Miracle Ridge.”

Sign up HERE to schedule a time to visit for a day or camp for a few nights and take a stand with the Limperts. The encampment will start on Friday, June 29 and will run at least until the first week of September when people across the country will call on their leaders for climate action as part of the People’s Climate March.

The Limpert camp will be set up a very short walk from their mountain home. You will be able to park within a few hundred feet of your camping location. Water and emergency phone service will be available at the camp, as well as a full-time coordinator to greet you and provide assistance as needed. Please bring your own camping equipment and food.

Please list every date you are interested in a day visit or camping. You will have the option to participate in community potlucks, go on hikes, join open mic nights, and participate in community forums to discuss the ongoing resistance to the ACP in Bath County. Participants will be calling on all our leaders to stop these pipelines once and for all.

Take a stand this summer and join the No Pipeline Summer: Camp to Save the Limpert Land.

After you fill out the form, you will receive all the details you’ll need regarding location, directions, and more. For insurance purposes, participants must present some form of photo ID upon arrival. Multiple forms of ID including but not limited to a driver’s license will be accepted.

SIGN UP HERE TO JOIN THE CAMP.

Want to know more about the Limperts and their land?  Watch the video, The Truth Is in the Proof.

Richmond Times-Dispatch news coverage here.

MVP Sued for Erosion Damage

The Roanoke Times reported on May 30, 2018, that “Six Franklin County landowners are suing Mountain Valley Pipeline“, claiming their property was damaged by the company’s failure to control storm water runoff from a construction site. “Mountain Valley has shown a ‘startling disregard’ for the impacts of building a natural gas pipeline on its neighbors, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Roanoke. After heavy rains that started May 15, a swath of bare land that crews had cleared for the pipeline’s right of way became a channel for erosion, covering nearby Cahas Mountain Road with about 8 inches of mud.”

The plaintiffs’ suit states that inadequate erosion control caused a blanket of sediment and muddy water to swamp hay fields and make its way into nearby streams on their properties. “The landowners are asking a judge to do what they say state regulators have not: order a stop to construction until Mountain Valley has taken steps to ensure that the next heavy rain will not unleash another mudslide.”

Although the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality temporarily halted construction, there has been no formal stop-work order, and construction was allowed to resume on May 22.

MVP refused to comment on the lawsuit. DEQ and Mountain Valley officials have said none of the sediment had reached nearby Little Creek or other streams. However, the article reports, “That assertion was challenged by the lawsuit, which cited an email from DEQ employee Elizabeth Abe to one of her colleagues. Abe described a stream along nearby Brick Church Road ‘so choked with mud that no water was flowing,’ according to the lawsuit. The email also reported that Abe saw no erosion control devices installed at the worksite.”

Read the full article here.

Nelson Pipeline Route Plant Rescue, June 1-2


The first Nelson County pipeline plant rescue will happen Saturday and Sunday June 1-2, 2018, with Beth and Neal of Blackberry Botanicals. They would love to have as many volunteers as possible join this first rescue to learn from Blackberry Botanicals so they can host future rescues.

Meet on Saturday at 9am off of Horizons Village Road (off Rt. 151 near Bold Rock Cidery). Take the first right after turning onto Horizons Village Road (there will be a sign). Drive through the open private property gate and continue all the way up. Someone will direct you to park in an open field at the top.

Gather at 9am in the clearing for an orientation with Blackberry Botanicals and to sign a liability waiver for your activity during the weekend. After the orientation, everyone will walk along the pipeline route and identify plants to be transplanted.

Please wear long pants, long-sleeved shirts, sturdy shoes, and bring your own lunch and plenty of water. If you use insect repellant, please bring your own. Burlap sacks work well for collecting plant material as you walk. Digging implements (see photo above) are recommended.

You can watch the videos (part 1 and part 2) from the April Blackberry Botanicals training on YouTube.com/iHanuman. There is lots of good information in these videos to help you prepare for the work days.

The Sunday group is smaller (more volunteers needed if you are interested!), and will meet at 10am, most likely a little further up Horizons Village Road; location will be announced after the work day on Saturday.

Please email Sara Agelasto at sagelasto@gmail.com if you would like to participate so Blackberry Botanicals will know to expect you and can send you any last minute updates. Please also email sagelasto@gmail.com if you cannot make this first rescue, but would like to participate in future rescues.

And if you are a landowner and would like to request a rescue on your property, please email sagelasto@gmail.com so Blackberry Botanicals can schedule more rescues in the future.