Category Archives: Pipeline Route

ACP Impact Statements from Union Hill


Atlantic Coast Pipeline impact statements from members of the Union Hill community in Buckingham County. Dominion wants to put the sole Virginia ACP compressor station in the heart of this small historically Black community founded by descendants of freed slaves. Local residents see the pipeline company’s disregard for their community as part of an established history of environmental racism in Virginia.

New Tree Sit at Little Teel Crossing


A report from Carolyn and Ian Reilly about the new tree sit:

“In the farmlands of Franklin County, a new stand against the Mountain Valley Pipeline has begun. Three tree sits loom directly in the path of the pipeline’s destruction, making it impossible to clear the way without severely injuring the inhabitants of those trees. The sits tower over 75 feet off the ground of a small family farm’s livestock pasture, overlooking Little and Teel creeks, home to the endangered Roanoke Log Perch.

“The tree sits build upon two other blockades to construction- a stand one hundred miles West, on Peters Mountain, and twenty miles West, in Bent Mountain, VA. One tree sitter stated, “The other tree sits show us that there are still effective ways to interrupt the violence of this proposed pipeline. We are celebrating their spirit of resistance in the mountains and bringing it down to the farmlands, where so much remains at stake. The fire truly is catching.” Local farmers Ian and Carolyn Reilly have been fighting the pipeline for their family’s future and to protect the soil and water. Using restorative practices, the Reilly’s are stewards of the earth. Ian Reilly said, “Launching Little Teel Crossing is an act of protection for our family’s home, land and water. This farm has been free from chemicals for decades. As farmers seeking to renew the land, we intend to keep it that way.”

“MVP’s 125-foot limits of destruction cuts through several family farms in Franklin County—places where local beef, honey, poultry, and produce are cultivated. According to the Roanoke Times, Precision Pipeline, the company contracted to construct the MVP, has a history of environmental violations and lawsuits for construction of several other pipelines.”

For more information, follow the Little Teel Crossing Facebook page.

Stand with Red: It’s a Family Affair


Red is still tree sitting on her own land. Hear what her husband has to say.

Those taking direct action to block construction of fracked gas pipelines in Virginia are peaceful and informed. They are diverse and they are us. “Stand with Red: It’s a Family Affair” from Water is life. Protect it. allows you to meet one marriage at the center of this courage. The Terry family of Bent Mountain gladly gave private land for the local school, now community center, and again gave land to power lines because these sacrifices benefited the local common good. They are resisting the MVP because it harms the local good, the water future, and benefits only a private out of state corporation. Please support all those protecting your water with your presence, your prayers and your support.

Your Help Wanted – CSI Volunteer Options


The Pipeline Compliance Surveillance Initiative (CSI) is a program developed by the Allegheny-Blue Ridge Alliance and its member organizations to support citizen efforts to ensure strict application of environmental laws and regulations in the construction and operation of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline (ACP). The need for citizen oversight of pipeline construction has been made clear by observations of recent pipeline projects and inadequate regulatory agency response to repeated violations and water resource harm.

Pipeline CSI will focus first on the approximately 200-mile section of the proposed ACP route extending from Harrison County in West Virginia to Buckingham County in Virginia. The extreme earth disturbance required for construction of the ACP in this area of steep mountain sides, high-quality streams, and karst valleys presents an unacceptable risk to water resources.

You can help! Here are the various ways volunteers can participate:

Citizen Observers

  • Work independently or with other organizations to observe and report incidents of both downstream surface water impact and noncompliance with construction requirements.
  • May be organized by coordinators affiliated with local or other regional organizations.
  • Access for viewing pipeline construction areas will ordinarily be limited to public roads or other public vantage points.
  • General guidance for citizen observers is provided on the Pipeline CSI website.
  • Can submit incident reports to CSI Central by using methods provided on the Pipeline CSI website or by methods provided by other organizations.

Stream Monitoring Program Volunteers

  • Participate in monitoring programs managed by local watershed groups and regional programs such as the Trout Unlimited/West Virginia Rivers Pipeline Monitoring program or the Isaak Walton League Save Our Streams program.
  • Take part in training and certification conducted by the monitoring programs.
  • Follow protocols and reporting methods established by the monitoring programs.
  • Can submit incident reports to CSI Central using methods provided on the Pipeline CSI website or by methods provided by the stream monitoring programs.

Research and Administration Volunteers

  • Monitor ACP filings to FERC including the Environmental Compliance and Weekly Status Reports.
  • Monitor FERC docket for inspection reports, variance requests, and other ACP constructionrelated documents.
  • Review construction-related documents provided by regulatory agencies.

CSI First Responders

  • Teams dispatched by CSI Central to investigate reported incidents of surface water impacts or noncompliance with pipeline construction requirements.
  • Recruited based on professional or scientific background related to water resources or erosion and sediment control and stormwater management.
  • Collect data and investigate reported incidents following Pipeline CSI protocols.

Pipeline Air Force

  • Pilots recruited and trained to fly routine pipeline surveillance flights and incident response flights.
  • Photographers recruited to obtain aerial imagery of pipeline construction areas.
  • Drone operators recruited and trained to obtain aerial imagery of pipeline construction areas.
  • Pipeline Air Force participants will follow Pipeline CSI protocols.

CSI Incident Review

  • Provide input to the Pipeline CSI Environmental and Forensic Review Teams evaluating incidents of surface water impacts or noncompliance with construction requirements.
  • Access to review information will be provided through the online CSI Mapping System.
  • Review assistance is requested from professionals with erosion and sediment control and stormwater management backgrounds, as well as from other knowledgeable individuals.
  • Training will be scheduled for interested participants, and information concerning regulatory and technical requirements will be provided through the Pipeline CSI website.

BECOME A CSI VOLUNTEER! Go to: http://pipelineupdate.org/csi-help/

Questions? Contact Lew Freeman – lewfreeman@gmail.com or 540-468-2769

Dominion Refuses Route Change Recommended by Own Contractor

As this April 6, 2018, comment to FERC makes clear, Dominion not only ignores expert citizen input, but also ignores the recommendations of the experts they themselves hired.

Little Valley, Bath County, VA, near ACP mile marker 93 of the ACP, is underlaid by limestone and is characterized by numerous karst features including springs and sinkholes. Most Little Valley residents depend entirely on spring water for all household and agricultural needs. Little Valley Run is a high quality spring-fed stream that holds native brook trout year round. The Valley Center area of Highland County is very similar to Little Valley and faces many of the same threats from the ACP.

Dominion has constantly assured citizens that their concerns about problems associated with placing a pipeline of this size through limestone aquifers were being addressed. Dominion hired GeoConcepts, an engineering firm with expert knowledge of karst topography, to evaluate and make recommendations regarding the proposed route.

The comment to FERC states that it has now become evident that Dominion has been routinely ignoring the advice of GeoConcepts, which proposed a route that would avoid karst areas in both Bath and Highland Counties – a route that was rejected by Dominion. Further, this route, which would have avoided karst areas in Valley Center, Little Valley, and Burnsville, would seem to be almost identical to one proposed by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation in a letter to FERC in August 2017.

“It seems clear that Dominion has no intention of voluntarily facing the problems that they have created for themselves by ignoring the reality of the terrain they have chosen for the ACP. Both GeoConcepts and the Virginia DCR have recommended a route that would avoid the degradation of sensitive karst areas in both Bath and Highland Counties. We are relying on the members of the State Water Control Board to hold Dominion to their promises to protect the most precious resource we have — our water.”

Read the full comment here.