Category Archives: Videos

Ten Reasons to Oppose the ACP


Back in January we posted ten reasons why Friends of Nelson opposes the Atlantic Coast Pipeline and said you’d be hearing more about them. Now we’re happy to share our slide show on the 10 reasons – use it to help you to explain to family, friends, neighbors, and legislators why you oppose the ACP.

A Look Back

On May 28, 2020, we posted an Allegheny-Blue Ridge Alliance commentary, Six Years and Counting! reflecting on the six years of our fight against Dominion’s Atlantic Coast Pipeline. There was no real demand or need in 2014, and there is even less demand or need in 2020.

Take a look back with two videos, both made in 2015.  The arguments made in the videos are still good – and six years later, the ACP is nowhere near a done deal!

In 2015, Arlo Bloom was a 14-year-old Nelson County resident who would be a 9th grader at Nelson County High School in September 2015. For his 8th grade end of the year school project he created an 18-minute documentary about the Atlantic Coast Pipeline and the issues concerning it.  In the documentary, speaking about the ACP, Connie Brennan, then a member of the Nelson County Board of Supervisors and now Vice President of Friends of Nelson, says, “Young people really need to take this seriously because this is our land, this is our world, and we need all of you to stand up and say, ‘Hey! Hello! You’re leaving all of this to us! What can we do? What should we be doing? What do we want to see for the future?’”


Julie Burns’ brother and sister-in-law, George McCollough and Anna Savoia, made a wonderful video titled “No Pipeline, Say the Friends of Nelson.” You may recognize some of your neighbors in the 29 minute film, including the late John Ed Purvis, a passionate pipeline opponent.  After six years, Julie has just stepped down as Friends of Nelson Board member and Secretary – thanks, Julie!

Averitt Makes Case Against FERC


Richard Averitt making the case that the current FERC approach is unfair and destructive and must be changed. Click here for the video, made for Artivism’s SUN SiNG concert series.

Related news stories from the past few days:

Wild VA Film Festival – Online


Join Wild Virginia for music, environmental films, door prizes, and speakers. ALL ONLINE!! Launching on World Environment Day, the festival will be available to you for 48 hours. The first 100 people to sign up will be entered into a drawing for some special prizes and if you find the code word during the festival you will be eligible for another prize!

Sign up here!

Once you sign up, Wild Virginia will send you a password to watch the show.

ACP Effects on Virginia Wetlands


From the Digital Commons at Longwood University comes this interesting 15 minute video presentation on The Atlantic Coast Pipeline: Effects on Wetlands in Virginia, a Longwood University Student Showcase by Travis Wood and Coleman Behne, April 22, 2020.

Their summary statement:

Wetland mitigation banking is a familiar topic in Virginia, especially with the introduction of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline. The proposed pipeline, which extends from West Virginia to North Carolina, impacts nearly 315 acres of wetlands in Virginia alone. Under current Virginia law, wetlands are to be undisturbed by any destruction-related actions. The pipeline, however, has raised many questions as to why the State is making certain exceptions for a natural gas pipeline. There is a gap between society’s demand for natural gas and the negative environmental impacts the pipeline brings. Environmental justice is also a concern, when groups of people resist placing compressor stations in their communities (e.g. Buckingham County). The wetlands that will see the largest impact is the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, with 22 proposed wetland crossings that will impact 75.9 acres of wetlands. This paper examines how the pipeline is able to disturb wetlands that are deemed ‘untouchable’. The proposed pipeline also comes within 100 feet of wildlife boundaries. Additionally, 13 forested wetlands will be crossed resulting in 21.7 acres of permanent conversion to scrub-shrub or herbaceous wetlands. In preparing plans and scoping areas the natural gas pipeline can pass through, many wetlands and other nationally protected areas are being disturbed and we examine whether the potential benefits outweigh the negatives.