‘Everyday People’ vs. Corporate Goliath

Who.What.Why discusses the David vs Goliath battle of “everyday people” against Dominion in a November 25, 2019 article. “It seems like a David vs. Goliath battle. Since 2014, a coalition of environmental, civil rights, and community groups, along with some local businesses, has fought in court to block a massive $8 billion pipeline. The anti-pipeline coalition, which is represented by an environmental law firm, is up against a politically connected corporation with 7.5 million customers in 18 states, 21,000 employees, and 2018 earnings of $2.4 billion.”

In addition to eliminating “more than 6,800 acres of forest — an area the size of eight Central Parks” and upending the lives of people living on or near its route, the Atlantic Coast Pipeline “has implications for millions of ratepayers in both Virginia and North Carolina. It also raises concerns about a major utility’s investment in fossil fuels, at a time when carbon emissions are jeopardizing the way humans live in the future.”

The article discusses the Supreme Court’s agreement to hear Dominion’s appeal of the December 2018 Fourth Circuit ruling that “the US Forest Service does not have the authority to grant Dominion the right to build its pipeline across the Appalachian Trail ‘at its preferred crossing point,’ on federal lands,” and why a Dominion victory in the Supreme Court would not be the last word, how the pipeline could punish Dominion ratepayers, whether (or not) Dominion’s political clout will prevail, as well as the surge in grassroots political engagement to fight the ACP.

Lewis Freeman, executive director of the Allegheny–Blue Ridge Alliance (ABRA), a coalition of 51 community and environmental groups of which Friends of Nelson is one, says the ACP has energized average citizens.

“Pipeline construction will require ACP engineers to sheer the tops off some mountain ridges. When Freeman asked an engineer what they would do with all that rock and soil, the engineer responded that the materials would be ‘”carefully set aside” and then “put back the way it was.” Well, you don’t have to be an engineer to blink at that,’ Freeman said. ‘Are they gonna put it back with Gorilla glue?'”

Freeman continued, saying, “‘Notwithstanding the length of time this battle has gone, I marvel at the people and organizations that have, from the early stages, opposed this project. Most of our members are community groups, citizens groups, many of which were formed as a result of the pipeline proposal.’ These ‘involved activists had never been involved in a fight like this before,’ Freeman added. ‘So when Dominion talks about the “wild-eye environmentalists,” they’re mischaracterizing who their opposition is. They’re everyday people who just think this is a lousy project in the wrong place.'”

Who.What.Why notes that, “Dominion did not respond to two requests for comment on this story.”

Read the full article here.