Hurricane Could Devastate Pipeline Projects

A September 11, 2018 Washington Post article, Hurricane could devastate Virginia pipeline project that is already struggling with changing weather, points out that the wet summer of 2018 “has already overcome some efforts to prevent runoff and erosion” along then Mountain Valley Pipeline route, and the Atlantic Coast Pipeline will face similar problems if construction begins on that.

State officials say that even if the projects meet all construction guidelines, “those guidelines are based on standards that do not account for recent changes in weather patterns. …. In some cases, a level of rain that once may have occurred every two years has instead happened more than once in a month, staff members said. ‘There have certainly been conversations that given precipitation and climatic changes that . . . maybe there should be a different standard, but at this moment that’s what your regulation says,’ Melanie Davenport, the director of water permitting, told the [State Water Control] board.”

Department of Environmental Quality officials, their numbers reduced after a decade of budget and staff cuts, are unable to monitor the construction properly, especially given the steep and rough terrain and the many stream crossings of both the MVP and ACP.

Erosion controls have already proved inadequate for current levels of rainfall, and pipeline zones could be devastated by Florence. David Sligh, who is retired from the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality and now works with the Wild Virginia advocacy group, spoke to the Post: “‘I don’t believe they can, in some of these circumstances, do anything that would be adequate,’ he said. ‘That’s the real crime here, if I can use that word. People have known, the companies have known, DEQ has known that the pollution control measures are inadequate. The fact they’ve been allowed to go forward makes me very angry.'”