Not One New Report, But Two


Not one, but two, recently released reports by physicians discuss and document the health risks, both immediate and long-range, of fracking and fracked gas.

A collaboration of health professionals with the Washington and Oregon chapters of Physicians for Social Responsibility have spent many months synthesizing and reviewing research and data, making new findings and conclusions on the threat of fracked gas infrastructure in the Pacific Northwest and how elected officials should respond to the crisis at hand. The report discusses impacts to fishing, safety hazards from facility and pipeline malfunctions, mental health stress on people who may lose their homes and jobs to eminent domain or habitat destruction, and more. Specific case studies include the Jordan Cove LNG project in Oregon and the Tacoma LNG facility and Kalama Methanol refinery in Washington State. Download a PDF of their report, Fracked Gas: A Threat to Healthy Communities. Press coverage is here.

Meanwhile, another review by doctors and scientists of 1,778 articles from peer-reviewed medical or scientific journals, investigative reports by journalists, and reports from government agencies on fracking concludes that the industry poses a threat to air, water, climate, and human health. Physicians for Social Responsibility and Concerned Health Professionals of New York, found that 69 percent of studies on water quality during the same time period found evidence of or potential for fracking-associated water contamination, and 87 percent of studies on air quality found “significant air pollutant emissions” associated with the industry. Their report also examines studies on the natural gas industry’s impact on climate change, and finds that due to methane leaks, natural gas extraction could be contributing to global warming even more than coal. Download their report, Compendium of Scientific, Medical, and Media Findings Demonstrating Risks and Harms of Fracking. Press coverage is here.

Note also the earlier 2017 report from Physicians for Social Responsibility, Too Dirty, Too Dangerous: Why health professionals reject natural gas.