Pipe Coatings

In a letter to FERC,submitted as a Motion to Intervene on September 16, 2019, Bill Limpert discusses Dominion’s July 22 and August 23 reports to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). The Dominion reports were in response to FERC’s July 3 request for data regarding possible environmental and health impacts from the 3M Scotchkote Fusion Bonded Epoxy 6233 external pipe coating, and other pipe coating products used for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline.

Limpert says, “I believe Dominion’s reports significantly understate the risk to public health and the environment from this coating, and other products used on the exterior of the pipe. I believe the reports use questionable data, and questionable methodologies to arrive at unreliable conclusions, and therefore, do not adequately answer the FERC’s request for information, or the concerns raised by the Virginia Department of Health.”

Limpert then critiques Dominion’s July 22 report in detail, covering the lack of leaching studies, the impacts of degradation and the long-term health impacts.

He states, “The Dominion reports use questionable data and questionable methodologies to arrive at unreliable conclusions. They do not prove the pipeline coating is safe, or that there will be no negative health or environmental impacts from the coating and associated products used on the exterior of the pipes for the ACP. They do not reliably answer the questions presented in FERC’s request, nor the concerns of the Virginia Department of Health.”

Limpert’s critique of the July 22 report concludes with a list of recommendations for actions FERC should take, including additional study using valid data and methodology, consultation with federal agencies with expertise, advising the US Fish and Wildlife Service that a 3M Material Declaration states that UV degradation byproducts will be toxic to aquatic life, requiring ACP to conduct pre and post construction sampling for chemicals associated with this coating and other products used on the exterior of the pipes in drinking water wells and springs in the vicinity of the proposed pipeline, requiring ACP to provide a potable water source and fair compensation for drinking water sources that are contaminated by these products, and requiring that all pipes be immediately covered to prevent UV degradation material from becoming airborne.

Limpert also writes a detailed critique of Dominion’s August 23 report.

Read the full letter and the attachments to it here.