Pipe Storage Risks

Bill Limpert’s column in the Richmond Times-Dispatch for February 28, 2019, Pipelines put health and environment at risk – and we don’t need them anyway, discusses the risks from the pipes themselves, pipes that have now been stored outdoors, exposed to weather, for far longer than expected and far longer than manufacturers recommend.

Limpert lists the issues with the pipes:

  • Pipes for both ACP and MVP are coated with a fusion bonded epoxy (FBE) to reduce pipe corrosion and explosion risk that degrades when exposed to sunlight and is now chalking off the pipes. “The National Association of Pipe Coating Manufacturers Bulletin 12-78-04 recommends that pipes coated with FBE without additional protection be stored no more than six months in the sun. The ACP admits that all of their pipes will be stored much longer than that, and even longer than the recommendation of pipe manufacturer Dura-Bond. The MVP testified in court that they were concerned about FBE loss.” At this point, ACP pipes have been stored outside for approximately three years, and will continue to be stored outside while the project is on hold.
  • The federal Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) confirms that FBE is coming off the pipes, yet maintains the pipes are safe – but they won’t divulge how many of the estimated 80,000 ACP pipes have been inspected, won’t give any detailed inspection information, and say that no inspection results will be available until the ACP is completed. [In other words, we won’t tell you anything about safety of the pipes until the construction that uses them is finished!]
  • “The Material Safety Data Sheet for the 3M Scotchkote Fusion Bonded Epoxy 6233 used on these pipes lists carcinogenic, mutagenic, and toxic properties. Health impacts include reproductive, developmental, and respiratory impairment.” The material coming off the pipes is now in the environment, and most likely in “the surface and ground waters, and is being ingested through drinking water, especially by persons in karst areas using wells and springs for their drinking water.”

And while the pipelines are delayed, the pipes continue to sit, exposed to sun and all kinds of adverse weather.

Further information on the hazards of long-term storage of pipe segments is in our previous articles on the topic, see PHMSA and the Safe Storage of Pipe, posted on June 21, 2018, and Pipe Storage: Write to PHMSA, posted on April 23. 2018.  See also Pipeline Chemical Coatings Are Serious Concerns, from NRDC in October 2018.  Even in April, June, and October, the pipes had been stored outside for longer than their recommended time – and now it has been even longer!